Time Management Tips, Tools, and Readings

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Time Management Tips, Tools, and Readings

Lately, I have been getting questions on time management. I believe that time is the great equalizer. Anyone who has taken one of my classes knows that I stress the importance of using our 86,400 each day (number of seconds in a day) as best we can in alignment with our future goals and current commitments.

Some of the tools and resources that have informed my view on time management are below. I hope they can be helpful.

Book: Eat that Frog! by Brian Tracy https://www.amazon.com/Eat-That-Frog-Twenty-one-Procrastinating/dp/0792754840 *This book comes to mind every morning when I organize my tasks for the day. Some other books that are suggested from Entrepreneur Magazine can be found here: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/329378.

Tool: Smartsheet https://www.smartsheet.com/ *I use this for task management for projects and managing a portion of my calendar for appointments.

App: Stay Focused https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.stayfocused&hl=en *I use this to manage my usage of certain apps during the day—to ensure I am not taking time away from my long-term goals (Dream in Progress).

Articles: Time Management by HBR https://hbr.org/topic/time-management *I appreciate these posts for perspective on a variety of elements of time management from email management to work tasks prioritization.

Tool: Amazon Alexa https://alexa.amazon.com *I use this to track tasks, keep lists for different projects and errands, and to set reminders for myself.

Tool: Google Home Mini https://store.google.com/product/google_home_mini *I use this to sync to my Google calendar. I routinely block off time to put tasks on the calendar that I love to do and do not like to do (this ensure I am accountable).

Tool: Google Calendar https://calendar.google.com *I use Google calendar to manage my calendar each week.

Exercise: Goals Mapping and Vision Board *Each month, I write out goals according to my wheel of life diagram (which has my six core areas of focus in my life). I routinely look at this list and when I do have extra time, I try to tackle the items on this list. Each core area has approximately four to eight target items on it and yes, relaxing is one of them :)

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Pitch Perfect

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Pitch Perfect

Nice Glasses
What is one thing that you can improve upon in your next presentation?
— Reflection Prompt
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Do you remember what you wrote to yourself?
— Dream in Progress Follow-Up
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Pay it Forward: One piece of advice for me for my move to Norway from New York.
— Active Learning Prompt

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Beyond the individual Sogetsu Ikebana lesson: Takeaways from in a suiban without a kenzan- Workshop with Mrs. Mihori

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Beyond the individual Sogetsu Ikebana lesson: Takeaways from in a suiban without a kenzan- Workshop with Mrs. Mihori

I was able to attend my first Sogetsu ikebana workshop in Maryland in September with approximately thirty other women from the area. The workshop included a demonstration, lesson, and individual critique from Mrs. Mihori, a Sogetsu ikebana teacher of the highest rank. I really enjoyed the experience—learning from Mrs. Mihori as she designed her work and taught techniques and tips for ikebana design in a suiban without a kenzan. As I look back on the experience, there were several key elements that were highlighted that not only applied to the individual theme of the workshop but will also be on my mind as I work on my ikebana designs moving forward in pursuit of my teaching certification in the Sogetsu school.

Structure, balance, and weight are a focal point to start. When working with a suiban without a kenzan, I had to think about the weight of my materials in addition to their own individual balance points before bringing them together into an arrangement in a suiban. Mrs. Mihori highlighted that the structure of the vase coupled with type of balance that could be created by connecting specific elements of the arrangement together using ikebana wire, allowed for the foundation for a successful arrangement. In arrangements that I think about moving forward, I am going to be more mindful of the balance needed not only with the vase but also within the inner structure of the arrangements I create.

Happy flowers are possible. In watching the critiques of the different arrangements created, I noticed a theme of adjusting the flowers to be in a ‘happy’ position. I watched Mrs. Mihori use different techniques to create almost a scaffolding to hold flowers in a position where they were facing up, towards the light—essentially a ‘happy’ place. I can shift my flowers in any arrangement moving forward so they can be ‘happy’.

Ikebana wire has a technique. Mrs. Mihori taught how to use ikebana wire more effectively. I learned how to start with a tight pull with only one twist. I then learned to tighten the wire in a circular direction. The ikebana wire was a great tool and also came in a variety of colors that could blend with the flowers and sticks I was using. In some cases, I used double wire. Moving forward, I can use wire more effectively and minimally if I continue to work on my wire closing technique.

The intention of the line matters. I noticed in the critiques that Mrs Mihori would ask students where the line was intended to be in the arrangement. While you could tell she had an ideal direction, she worked with students wherever they wanted the line to go. I learned from this that the direction and flow (even without movement) of the design was important in learning where to trim down or enhance the arrangement. I will be able to think more about the intention of my lines in my arrangements moving forward.

Depth and height are critical. My arrangement ended up having great height but in the pursuit of a structure that was strong and did not fold, the design became flat. Mrs. Mihori encouraged me to think about how to flip some of the branches to add more depth to my design. I can use this concept moving forward but thinking through the total area of my work and balancing not only structure but height and depth as well in my designs.

Learn more about Sogetsu Ikebana: http://www.sogetsu.or.jp/e/know/about/.

A recap of the event can be found here: http://sogetsudc.org/index.php/past-branch-events-2/.

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Hospitality Heat of Addiction Roundtable at Cornell

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2018 Reading List for Class Conversations

Break gives everyone an opportunity to take a pause, reflect, and read to open the mind. Some books for consideration:

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

In this book, Angela Duckworth shows anyone striving to succeed –parents, students, educators, athletes, or business people (both seasoned and new) – that the secret to outstanding achievement is not talent but a focused persistence called grit.

Goodreads: Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

In Drive, Daniel H. Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others), asserts that the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today's world is the deep human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

Goodreads: Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World by Adam Grant

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

From the author of Give and Take and co-author of Option B, Originals, examines how people can champion new ideas—and how leaders can fight groupthink: choose to champion novel ideas and values that go against the grain, battle conformity, and buck outdated traditions.

Goodreads: Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World

Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

In this book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers" – the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?

Goodreads: Outliers: The Story of Success

The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future by Steve Case

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

From Steve Case – one of America’s most accomplished entrepreneurs – The Third Wave presents a compelling roadmap for how anyone can succeed in a world of rapidly changing technology.

Goodreads: The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future

Principles: Life and Work by Ray Dalio

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

Ray Dalio, one of the most successful entrepreneurs and investors of our time, writes about the unconventional principles he has developed to create unparalleled results in his life and business endeavors.  His expertise and advice can be adopted by anyone.

Goodreads: Principles: Life and Work

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers by Alexander Osterwalder

Preview Link: Google Books

Purchase Link: Amazon

Alexander Osterwalder’s Business Model Generation is a book meant for game changers looking to defy old fashioned business models and revolutionize enterprises.

Goodreads: Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers

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